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The ‘Happy House’ that Rose Built

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WEST HOLLYWOOD, CA - JANUARY 10:  Producer David Heyman (R) and Rose Uniacke attend the 3rd AACTA International Awards at Sunset Marquis Hotel & Villas on January 10, 2014 in West Hollywood, California.  (Photo by Mike Windle/Getty Images for AACTA)

Magical interiors: Harry Potter producer David Heyman and Rose Uniacke attend the 3rd AACTA International Awards at Sunset Marquis Hotel & Villas on January 10, 2014 in West Hollywood, California

Award winning interior designer and antiques dealer Rose Uniacke [pronounced Uniaak] is so hot right now her name adorns some of the most desirable home refit projects in west London’s golden postcodes. The stylish socialite who decorates homes for the stars and London’s jet-set described the cavernous home she shares with husband Harry Potter director David Heyman as “Monastery meets Venetian palazzo”.

Her earthy lived-in style has won her many interior design accolades and the trust of the Beckhams who dumped their previous designer Queen of beige Kelly Hoppen and commissioned her to fit out their £40m home in Holland Park, west London.

Rose Uniacke's Pimlico home

Airy: Uniacke has described her Pimlico home as the ‘happy house’ | ROSEUNIACKE.COM

She dubbed her home ‘the happy house’ in a video series, In Residence, for the lifestyle blog Nowness. Built by the architect George Morgan in 1861 for James Rannie Swinton, a society portraitist, every inch of the sprawling 14,000-square-foot home has benefitted from Uniacke’s signature attention to detail and a nod to antiquities with some quirky twists along the way. There is a concealed door that melts into a wallpapered wall in the courtyard. Across the home’s many rooms, the designer’s taste for stealth luxury and shabby chic is evident.

Nowness editors described the exterior of the interior designer’s Georgian Revival in Pimlico as “almost unremarkable, except for a high side window that, if inspected more closely, reveals a sense of scale, hinting at the glorious proportions within”.

They concluded: “Across the home’s many rooms, the designer’s taste for soft luxury and almost academic approach to design history, from antiques to modernist marvels, is pleasingly evident. Here, much like at her beloved Pimlico Road shop, the contemporary sits in conversation with a rather British sense of sumptuousness, the results unfathomably grand yet somehow unpretentious, lived in, and entirely enviable.”

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