Month: September 2019

Climate Emergency: A Dystopian Future with a Dramatic End

The Financial Times and Chelsea’s Royal Court Theatre have collaborated to produce Climate Change: what do you want me to say? – a filmed monologue about the climate crisis. The nine-minute film, written by Chris Thorpe and directed by Juliet Riddell from the FT, takes the form of a newscast from 2050. Featuring Nicola Walker, as newsreader, Climate Change: what do you want me to say? dramatically explores visions of both a dystopian and utopian future and raises questions about our planet’s climate emergency. It asks why it is taking the world so long to deal with it in the serious and urgent manner that is needed. Before writing Climate Change: what do you want me to say? Chris Thorpe and the Royal Court Theatre’s Vicky Featherstone (Artistic Director) and Lucy Davies (Executive Producer) met with Financial Times journalists Pilita Clarke and Leslie Hook to discuss the climate crisis. Areas covered included looking at the role of news and how communications around global heating may not be helping actions needed now. Juliet Riddell, producer and director of …

Dior’s Designer of Dreams is Most Visited Show in V&A’s History

Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams has smashed visitor records at the Victoria and Albert Museum after a blockbuster first run in Paris. The cultural attraction confirmed 594,994 had come through its doors surpassing the previous attendance figures recorded for Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty in 2015 by over 100,000 visitors. The blockbuster show was still drawing the crowds 48 hours before the retrospective came to an end on 1 September. The most comprehensive exhibition ever staged in the UK on the House of Dior, Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams traced the history and impact of the brand from 1947 to the present day examining one of the 20th century’s most influential couturiers, and the six artistic directors who have succeeded him. Drawn from the extensive Dior Archives and the V&A’s extensive Couture collections, the exhibition presented over 500 objects, with over 200 rare Haute Couture garments shown alongside accessories, fashion photography, film, vintage perfume, original make-up, illustrations, magazines, and Christian Dior’s personal possessions.  Based on the major exhibition Christian Dior: Couturier du Rêve, organised by the …

J’Adior! Record-breaking Dior Show Totes and Tees Flew off the Shelves

Dior and fashion fans were still zig-zagging round the block 48 hours before the show closed at Albertopolis on 1 September. The V&A’ s most popular show in history had had its equivalent of an encore after it was extended for a further seven weeks. A first run at Paris’ Musee des Arts Decoratifs which closed in early 2018, had also become one of the city’s most visited of all time. Even sales of the specially designed tote bag to commemorate the show at £25 a pop had been limited to three per customer. A sophisticated queuing system was operational and stopped right at the first room of curated exhibits. But Monsieur Dior had not always been a darling of the masses, sparking protests in fashion capitals with his radical reinvention of the hemline in 1949. Actress Zsa Zsa Gabor bemoaned the fate of some thirty of her most striking dresses after Dior lowered the hemline to 15 1/2 inches, but agreed with Dior’s new revolutionary length dresses. The designer felt that skirt lengths should …